What Does It Mean When A Dog Pees Blood?

What Does It Mean When A Dog Pees Blood

What do I do if my dog is peeing blood?

Get Immediate Help if You See Blood in Your Dog’s Urine – As a dog owner, you are your dog’s best friend can caregiver, so careful monitoring of your dog’s urination habits is an important part of keeping him healthy and happy. If you notice that there’s blood in your dog’s urine, it’s extremely important to take them to a vet or emergency vet as soon as possible.

Some causes of this condition are more severe than others, which is why a veterinarian needs to be consulted right away so they can get to the root of why this is happening to your pet and form a treatment plan to help them. If your general veterinarian is closed or unavailable, take your pet to an emergency vet in your area so your pet doesn’t have to wait to be examined.

: Blood in Dog Urine: Causes and What to Do

Is dog peeing blood an emergency?

If the dog is bright and well otherwise, not in obvious pain, and is still passing urine, blood in pee isn’t an emergency. However, it is potentially urgent, and it’s best to get seen within 24 hours.

Why would a dog start peeing blood?

3. Upper Urinary Tract Infections – In the upper urinary tract, kidney disease can cause blood in the urine. Upper urinary tract diseases often have additional symptoms such as increased thirst, vomiting, decreased appetite, lethargy, and abdominal pain. What Does It Mean When A Dog Pees Blood While bloody urine may be one of the first symptoms you notice, other urinary-related red flags that warrant a visit to your vet include straining to urinate, spurting, abnormally small or copious amounts of urine, increased thirst, pain, vomiting, decreased appetite, and lethargy.

If your dog is ever posturing to urinate but not producing any urine, seek immediate veterinary care from your family veterinarian or animal emergency hospital. Before arriving, always call ahead so the veterinary team knows to expect you and your dog. Click for information on urinary issues in cats or if your cat is peeing outside of the litter box.

Written by Geoff Gieni, DVM. What Does It Mean When A Dog Pees Blood : Why is My Dog Peeing Blood?

Can blood in urine go away on its own?

Can blood in urine go away on its own? – Blood in the urine may come and go or may persist. If blood in the urine clears, it does not mean you are free from concern. Blood in the urine should still be evaluated by a healthcare provider to identify the cause of bleeding and to ensure a serious condition is not present.

Why is my male dog peeing blood but acting normal?

Clotting Disorders – A coagulopathy, or condition in which the blood’s ability to clot is impaired, can cause excessive bleeding. This may be due to problems with the immune system or due to toxin ingestion such as rat bait ingestion. Bleeding disorders can be rapidly very serious and even fatal.

Dogs with a bleeding disorder may be very weak and lethargic, show bleeding from other parts of the body, or have pale gums. If bleeding also occurs internally in the chest or abdomen, this can cause extreme blood loss. A dog peeing blood and breathing heavily is a medical emergency. The age and sex of a dog may give some clues as to what is causing the bleeding.

A female dog peeing blood (but acting normal) is more likely to have a urinary tract infection or inflammation, whereas a male dog peeing blood (but acting normal) is more likely to have bladder stones or a prostate problem. A puppy peeing blood could be due to infection or a genetic condition that affects blood clotting or kidney function.

Can dehydration cause blood in urine?

It’s true that staying properly hydrated by drinking enough fluids — preferably, water — is good for your urinary tract and your body. If you’re dehydrated, your pee is darker in color. If you’re extremely dehydrated, you could possibly have bloody urine.

Do dogs pee blood with kidney failure?

Blood in Waste (Solid and Urine) – Once you spot blood in your dog’s waste, this is very severe and needs to be treated by a professional! Since the kidney cleans out the toxins, when it is not working properly, this causes digestive issue problems. It can be hard to push stool for your dog, causing bleeding.

Can stress cause blood in urine?

Why would I have blood in my urine but no infection? – Health conditions other than an infection may cause blood in the urine. These include trauma to the urinary tract, prostate enlargement, genetic blood disorders, and cancer. Stress alone does not cause blood in urine, but it may contribute to some urinary tract problems that can cause it.

What is the most common cause of blood in urine?

1. Urinary tract infections – Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the most common cause of blood in the urine. Since the urinary tract comprises the bladder, ureters and kidneys, a UTI is an infection anywhere in that system. A bladder infection is called cystitis, and a kidney infection is called pyelonephritis.

UTIs are typically caused when bacteria on the skin of the perineum (the space between the rectum and genitals) track in through the urethra and then into the bladder. If a bladder infection goes undetected or untreated, the infection can continue to spread upward through the ureters and into the kidneys.  Since women’s urethras are five times shorter than men’s, on average, women are much more prone to UTIs than men.

In addition to hematuria, common UTI symptoms include burning with urination, urinary frequency and urinary urgency. Patients with pyelonephritis can also experience flank or back pain, fever and vomiting. Anyone with UTI symptoms should seek medical attention, as antibiotics are required to treat the infection and reduce the risk of serious complications, like a kidney infection.

What color is a dog’s urine when they have kidney failure?

Serious Dog Urine Colors –

Pink or red: Pink coloration in a dog’s urine usually means the dog has some bleeding going on somewhere within the urinary tract. Although the cause of the bleeding may be nothing too serious, it still needs to be treated as soon as possible by a vet. Pink could indicate a urinary tract infection as well.

Red urine, however, is more serious. It means your dog has a lot of internal bleeding from the bladder, kidneys, or elsewhere in the urinary tract. It could indicate an injury, a very serious infection, cancer, or other severe issues that need prompt medical treatment.

Brown: Brown urine is not to be confused with dark yellow, caramel, or orange urine, which can indicate dehydration. Brown urine usually means there is internal bleeding somewhere within your dog’s body, and it can also be a sign of toxin ingestion in a dog.

If you know your dog has consumed something potentially harmful (such as a cleaning solution, a human food that is dangerous to dogs, or a foreign object), and you see brown urine, take him to the emergency vet immediately. This could be a sign of life-threatening symptoms related to your dog’s toxin ingestion.

Green: Finally, green urine can indicate there is something wrong with your dog’s kidneys. Although green urine is not very common, it is still a potential symptom to be on the lookout for, especially if you know your dog has already been diagnosed with kidney failure.

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Typically, green urine indicates late-stage kidney failure, cancer of the kidneys, or extremely severe urinary tract infection. Urine may turn green because bilirubin makes its way into the kidneys, where it is not supposed to be. Dogs will likely be very sick if they have reached the point of having green urine, but this is not always the case.

What Does It Mean When A Dog Pees Blood

What does blood in urine look like?

Male urinary system – Your urinary system includes the kidneys, ureters, bladder and urethra. The urinary system removes waste from the body through urine. The kidneys are located toward the back of the upper abdomen. They filter waste and fluid from the blood and produce urine.

  1. Urine moves from the kidneys through narrow tubes to the bladder.
  2. These tubes are called the ureters.
  3. The bladder stores urine until it’s time to urinate.
  4. Urine leaves the body through another small tube called the urethra.
  5. This condition happens when the kidneys or other parts of the urinary tract let blood cells leak into urine.

Different problems can cause this leaking to happen, including:

Urinary tract infections (UTIs). These happen when bacteria get into the tube through which urine leaves the body, called the urethra. Then the bacteria multiply in the bladder. UTIs can cause bleeding that makes urine look red, pink or brown. With a UTI, you also may have a strong urge to pee that lasts a long time. You may have pain and burning while peeing. Your urine may have a very strong smell too. Kidney infection. This type of UTI also is called pyelonephritis, Kidney infections can happen when bacteria enter the kidneys from the bloodstream. Infections also can happen when bacteria move to the kidneys from a pair of tubes that connect the kidneys with the bladder, called the ureters. Kidney infections can cause the same urine-related symptoms that other UTIs can. But they’re more likely to cause a fever and pain in the back, side or groin. A bladder or kidney stone. The minerals in urine can form crystals on the walls of the kidneys or bladder. Over time, the crystals can become small, hard stones. The stones are often painless. But they can hurt a lot if they cause a blockage or leave the body through urine. Bladder or kidney stones can cause blood in urine that can be seen with the naked eye as well as bleeding that can be seen only in the lab. Enlarged prostate. The prostate gland is just below the bladder, and it surrounds the top part of the urethra. It often gets bigger toward middle age. It then puts pressure on the urethra, partly blocking the flow of urine. With an enlarged prostate, you might have trouble peeing, an urgent or lasting need to pee, or blood in the urine. Infection of the prostate, called prostatitis, can cause the same symptoms. Kidney disease. Blood in urine that can be seen only in the lab is a common symptom of a kidney disease called glomerulonephritis. With this disease, the tiny filters in the kidneys that remove waste from blood become inflamed. Glomerulonephritis may be part of a condition that affects the whole body, such as diabetes. Or it can happen on its own. Cancer. Blood in urine that can be seen with the naked eye may be a sign of advanced kidney, bladder or prostate cancer. These cancers might not cause symptoms sooner, when treatments could work better. Inherited illnesses. A genetic condition that affects red blood cells, called sickle cell anemia, can cause blood in urine. The blood cells could be visible or too tiny to see. A condition that damages tiny blood vessels in the kidneys, called Alport syndrome, also can cause blood in the urine. Kidney injury. A blow or other injury to the kidneys from an accident or contact sports can cause blood to show up in urine. Medicines, The anti-cancer drug cyclophosphamide (Cytoxan) and the antibiotic penicillin are linked to blood in urine. Medicines that prevent blood clots also are tied to blood in urine. These include medicines that keep blood cells called platelets from sticking together, such as the pain reliever aspirin. Medicines that thin the blood, such as heparin, also may be a cause. Hard exercise. Blood in the urine can happen after playing contact sports, such as football. It may be linked to bladder damage caused by getting hit. Blood in urine also can happen with long-distance sports, such as marathon running, but it’s less clear why. It may be linked to bladder damage or other reasons that don’t involve an injury. When hard exercise causes blood in urine, it may go away on its own within a week. If you see blood in your urine after exercise, don’t assume it’s from exercising. See your health care provider.

Often the cause of hematuria is unknown.

Is blood in urine a serious problem?

If you notice blood in your urine, don’t panic, but do take it seriously. In many cases, blood in the urine, otherwise known as hematuria, can be easily treated. However, it can also point to a serious problem, such as cancer.

How long is blood in urine bad?

Topic Resources Blood in the urine (hematuria) can make urine appear pink, red, or brown, depending on the amount of blood, how long it has been in the urine, and how acidic the urine is. An amount of blood too small to change color of the urine (microscopic hematuria) may be found by chemical tests or microscopic examination.

  • Microscopic hematuria may be found when a urine test is done for another reason.
  • People with hematuria may have other symptoms of urinary tract disorders Overview of Urinary Tract Symptoms Kidney and urinary tract disorders can involve one or both kidneys, one or both ureters, the bladder, or the urethra, and in men, the prostate, one or both testes, or the epididymis.

Problems. read more, such as pain in the side or back (flank), lower abdominal pain, an urgent need to urinate, or difficulty urinating, depending on the cause of blood in the urine. If sufficient blood is present in the urine, the blood may form a clot.

Hemoglobin (which carries oxygen in red blood cells) in the urine due to the breakdown of red blood cells Muscle protein (myoglobin) in urine due to the breakdown of muscle cells Porphyria (a disorder caused by deficiencies of enzymes involved in the production of heme, a chemical compound that contains iron and gives blood its red color) Foods (for example, beets, rhubarb, and sometimes food coloring) Drugs (most commonly phenazopyridine, but sometimes cascara, diphenylhydantoin, methyldopa, rifampin, phenacetin, phenothiazines, and senna )

The most common causes differ somewhat by the person’s age but overall are Less common causes include Cancer and benign prostatic hyperplasia may cause blood in the urine. These disorders are a concern mainly in people over 50, although younger people with risk factors (smoking, family history, or chemical exposures) may develop cancer.

Disorders of the microscopic blood vessels of the kidneys (glomeruli) can be a cause at any age. Kidney filtering disorders (glomerular disorders) may be part of a kidney disorder or may occur as a result of a disorder elsewhere in the body. These disorders are more likely if the urine has protein, clumps of red blood cells (called red blood cell casts), or malformed red blood cells.

Such disorders include infections (such as a heart valve infection), connective tissue disorders (such as systemic lupus erythematosus Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) Systemic lupus erythematosus is a chronic autoimmune inflammatory connective tissue disorder that can involve joints, kidneys, skin, mucous membranes, and blood vessel walls. ) and vasculitis Overview of Vasculitis Vasculitic disorders are caused by inflammation of the blood vessels (vasculitis). Vasculitis can be triggered by certain infections or drugs or can occur for unknown reasons. People may have. read more, blood disorders (such as serum sickness), or certain chronic disorders (such as diabetes Diabetes Mellitus (DM) Diabetes mellitus is a disorder in which the body does not produce enough or respond normally to insulin, causing blood sugar (glucose) levels to be abnormally high.

Urination and thirst are. read more ). Also, almost any kind of kidney damage may cause small amounts of blood in the urine. Severe injuries, such as from a fall or a motor vehicle crash, can injure the kidneys or bladder and cause bleeding. Various procedures and surgeries (for example, inserting a catheter or doing a prostate or kidney biopsy) can also cause bleeding.

Doctors first try to establish that bleeding is the cause of red urine. Then they look for the cause of the bleeding, including where in the urinary tract (or occasionally elsewhere) the bleeding is originating. The following information can help people know when to see a doctor and what to expect during the evaluation.

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Large amount of blood in the urine Age over 50

People who notice blood in their urine should see their doctor within a day or two. However, people who are passing a large amount of blood, who are unable to urinate, or who have severe pain should see a doctor right away. Doctors then do a physical examination. People of any age who do not have an infection or a kidney filtering disorder as the cause of visibly bloody urine typically have imaging studies, such as computed tomography (CT), ultrasonography, or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the abdomen and pelvis.

For people under 50 who have only microscopic hematuria and no other abnormalities detected during the physical examination, blood tests, or urinalysis, doctors may simply repeat the urinalysis in 6 or 12 months. If blood is still present, they will do further tests. Treatment is directed at the cause of the bleeding.

Whatever the cause, if urine flow is blocked by blood clots, doctors usually insert a flexible tube in the bladder (urinary catheter) and try to flush out the blood clot.

Red urine is not always caused by blood. Many causes of blood in the urine are not serious. Risk of serious disease increases with age and the duration of the bloody urine. Testing for cancer is usually needed only for people over 50 or for younger people with risk factors for cancer.

Generic Name Select Brand Names
phenazopyridine AZO Urinary Pain Relief Maximum Strength, Azo-100, Azo-Gesic, Azo-Septic, Azo-Standard, Phenazo, Prodium, Pyridium, Urinary Analgesic, Uristat, Uristat Relief, Uristat Ultra
methyldopa Aldomet
rifampin Rifadin, Rifadin IV, Rimactane
senna Black Draught, Ex-Lax, Fletchers Laxative, Geri-kot, Lax-Pills, Little Remedies for Tummys, Perdiem, Plus PHARMA, Senexon, Senna, SennaGen, Senna-Lax, Senna-Tabs, Senna-Time, Sennatural, Senokot, Senokot Extra Strength, Senokot Xtra, SenoSol, SenoSol-X, Uni-Cenna

NOTE: This is the Consumer Version. DOCTORS: VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION VIEW PROFESSIONAL VERSION Copyright © 2023 Merck & Co., Inc., Rahway, NJ, USA and its affiliates. All rights reserved.

What happens if you ignore blood in urine?

Seeing blood in your urine would scare just about anyone. Although many causes for the bleeding are typically treatable, you shouldn’t ignore it—even if it’s only a small amount of blood and it goes away. Bloody urine may be a symptom of a serious health problem, including cancer, so it’s important to determine the cause as quickly as possible.

Gross, or visible while urinating or in the toilet water Microscopic, or detected only through a urine test or under a microscope

Too often, patients go to the emergency room with visible, painless signs of blood in their urine that’s misdiagnosed as a urinary tract infection (UTI) and treated with an antibiotic. “This is terribly, catastrophically common,” says Farshid Sadeghi, MD, Medical Director of the Genitourinary Center at City of Hope Phoenix,

“If it’s a UTI, there should be pain, there should be discomfort, there should be changes in urination, not just blood in the urine alone.” Is blood in the urine always cancer? No. But cancer is always a concern with painless, gross hematuria, says Dr. Sadeghi. And that’s why it must be properly evaluated.

In this article, we’ll explore the causes of blood in the urine, including which types of cancer may cause the condition. Topics include:

What may cause blood in the urine Why painless blood is cause for concern Blood in the urine and cancer

If you’ve been diagnosed with bladder or kidney cancer and are interested in a second opinion on your diagnosis and treatment plan, call us or chat online with a member of our team.

Why is my dog peeing blood and no vet?

What Causes Blood in Dog Urine? – Blood in the urine is called hematuria. The urinary tract consists of the kidneys, ureters, the bladder, and urethra, and bleeding can come from any of these areas and end up in the urine. In addition, blood in the urine can originate from the reproductive system if the dog is not spayed or neutered,

There are many potential causes for this bleeding, but it’s often caused by a condition that irritates the urinary tract. Though uncommon, hematuria may also occur due to a bleeding or clotting disorder. In addition, some toxins, including certain types of rat poison, can cause clotting problems that lead to blood in the urine.

Some forms of cancer, such as transition cell carcinoma, are known to cause blood in the urine. In addition, chemotherapy may lead to hematuria in dogs. Potential causes of blood in dog urine include:

Urinary tract infection (UTI) Kidney infection Bladder stones Kidney stones Nephritis (kidney inflammation) Prostate issues in males Uterine or vaginal issues in females Estrus (heat) in unspayed females Trauma Thrombocytopenia (low platelets) Tumors or polyps Cancer Toxin exposure (like rodenticide) Anatomical malformations

If all conditions have been ruled out, your veterinarian may diagnose idiopathic renal hematuria, ‘Idiopathic’ means that the cause is unknown. In cats, stress is believed to be a factor in a condition called feline idiopathic cystitis (bladder inflammation with unknown cause).

How do you tell if a dog has a UTI?

Dog UTI Symptoms – Like bladder infections in people, UTIs in dogs can be very painful. If your dog has a UTI, you might notice a number of signs, including:

  • Straining to urinate – Dogs with a UTI might strain to pee and be unable to go at all. They may also arch their backs, cry, or whine when they try to go to the bathroom because of the pain.
  • Blood in the urine – Blood or other discharge in the urine is a sure sign that something is up with your pup. Keep in mind that not all dogs with UTIs will have this symptom, but you should contact your veterinarian if you notice it.
  • Increased thirst – It can be hard to tell if your dog is drinking more water due to a UTI, especially in the summertime. But you should take note if you’re filling your dog’s water bowl more often than usual.
  • Frequent urination – If your dog can normally get through a good part of the day without having to pee but then suddenly needs to go out every hour or two, a UTI might be to blame.
  • Bathroom accidents – Dogs with a UTI can also have accidents around the house even though they are fully house-broken. This can happen because the dog is in pain or can’t control the flow of urine. UTIs can also cause a dog to leak pee even after they’ve gone to the bathroom.

Other signs that your dog has a UTI can include vomiting, strong-smelling urine, and a reduced appetite.

What can I give my dog for a UTI?

How to Treat Bladder Infection in Dogs – Antibiotics are the number one treatment for bladder infections in dogs. In some cases, your veterinarian may also prescribe anti-inflammatory medications or pain killers depending on the severity and underlying cause of your pet’s bladder infection.

  • While in some cases bladder infections in people will clear up without the need for medical care, this is unlikely to be true for your pup.
  • It’s also important to remember that, since our canine companions are unable to tell us how they’re feeling it is best to have any symptoms of illness checked out by your vet.

Left untreated your dog’s bladder infection could become much more severe and lead to complications. It’s also important to note that your dog’s bladder infection symptoms could be caused by a more serious underlying condition that needs veterinary care.

Can blood in urine be nothing to worry about?

Hematuria is the presence of blood in the urine. This can be caused by a number of different conditions. – Most of the time, the cause is not serious and will quickly self-resolve. Strenuous exercise is a cause of hematuria that is not serious. Certain foods (beets, berries, rhubarb) can give the urine a red, blood-like appearance that is nothing to worry about.

Does blood in urine mean kidney damage?

Signs of Kidney Disease –

You’re more tired, have less energy or are having trouble concentrating. A severe decrease in kidney function can lead to a buildup of toxins and impurities in the blood. This can cause people to feel tired, weak and can make it hard to concentrate. Another complication of kidney disease is anemia, which can cause weakness and fatigue. You’re having trouble sleeping. When the kidneys aren’t filtering properly, toxins stay in the blood rather than leaving the body through the urine. This can make it difficult to sleep. There is also a link between obesity and chronic kidney disease, and sleep apnea is more common in those with chronic kidney disease, compared with the general population. You have dry and itchy skin. Healthy kidneys do many important jobs. They remove wastes and extra fluid from your body, help make red blood cells, help keep bones strong and work to maintain the right amount of minerals in your blood. Dry and itchy skin can be a sign of the mineral and bone disease that often accompanies advanced kidney disease, when the kidneys are no longer able to keep the right balance of minerals and nutrients in your blood. You feel the need to urinate more often. If you feel the need to urinate more often, especially at night, this can be a sign of kidney disease. When the kidneys filters are damaged, it can cause an increase in the urge to urinate. Sometimes this can also be a sign of a urinary infection or enlarged prostate in men. You see blood in your urine. Healthy kidneys typically keep the blood cells in the body when filtering wastes from the blood to create urine, but when the kidney’s filters have been damaged, these blood cells can start to “leak” out into the urine. In addition to signaling kidney disease, blood in the urine can be indicative of tumors, kidney stones or an infection. Your urine is foamy. Excessive bubbles in the urine – especially those that require you to flush several times before they go away—indicate protein in the urine. This foam may look like the foam you see when scrambling eggs, as the common protein found in urine, albumin, is the same protein that is found in eggs. You’re experiencing persistent puffiness around your eyes. Protein in the urine is an early sign that the kidneys’ filters have been damaged, allowing protein to leak into the urine. This puffiness around your eyes can be due to the fact that your kidneys are leaking a large amount of protein in the urine, rather than keeping it in the body. Your ankles and feet are swollen. Decreased kidney function can lead to sodium retention, causing swelling in your feet and ankles. Swelling in the lower extremities can also be a sign of heart disease, liver disease and chronic leg vein problems. You have a poor appetite. This is a very general symptom, but a buildup of toxins resulting from reduced kidney function can be one of the causes. Your muscles are cramping. Electrolyte imbalances can result from impaired kidney function. For example, low calcium levels and poorly controlled phosphorus may contribute to muscle cramping.

How much blood in urine is worrisome?

Blood in your pee, whether visible to your eye or noted on a urine lab test, means something is not quite right with your health. Blood in urine is fairly common—nearly a third of adults will experience it—and there are a host of reasons why it happens, many of them issues that can be cleared up fairly easily.

  1. Your primary doctor or a urologist will be the one to give you a diagnosis.
  2. But this guide will help you figure out the reasons why there might be blood in your urine—and what tests you should ask for.
  3. First, though, you need to know about the two types of blood that can appear in your urine.
  4. Physicians call blood in your urine hematuria.

Gross hematuria (yeah, bloody pee is disgusting but that’s not what they mean) is blood that shows up in the toilet or after you wipe. It doesn’t take much, either. One milliliter of blood—about a fifth of a teaspoon—is enough to turn your pee red or pink.

  • Either way, if you see something, even once, make an appointment.
  • Then there’s microscopic hematuria, which is what it sounds like—blood that’s only visible under a microscope.
  • Anything over three or four red blood cells is considered abnormal.
  • Just don’t be fooled by the amount.
  • Doctors take microscopic levels just as seriously as they do gross hematuria because both types can be early signs of bladder or kidney cancer, especially if you have the risk factors for either cancer: you’re a smoker, past or present, you’re over 51, and you are male.

In a study done on 2,000 patients with microscopic levels of blood, researchers from Columbia University found that 1.2% had bladder cancer, So no, not huge numbers of people, but we’d consider them lucky: All were diagnosed when the cancer was in its earliest and most treatable stages.

Why is my dog peeing blood and no vet?

What Causes Blood in Dog Urine? – Blood in the urine is called hematuria. The urinary tract consists of the kidneys, ureters, the bladder, and urethra, and bleeding can come from any of these areas and end up in the urine. In addition, blood in the urine can originate from the reproductive system if the dog is not spayed or neutered,

There are many potential causes for this bleeding, but it’s often caused by a condition that irritates the urinary tract. Though uncommon, hematuria may also occur due to a bleeding or clotting disorder. In addition, some toxins, including certain types of rat poison, can cause clotting problems that lead to blood in the urine.

Some forms of cancer, such as transition cell carcinoma, are known to cause blood in the urine. In addition, chemotherapy may lead to hematuria in dogs. Potential causes of blood in dog urine include:

Urinary tract infection (UTI) Kidney infection Bladder stones Kidney stones Nephritis (kidney inflammation) Prostate issues in males Uterine or vaginal issues in females Estrus (heat) in unspayed females Trauma Thrombocytopenia (low platelets) Tumors or polyps Cancer Toxin exposure (like rodenticide) Anatomical malformations

If all conditions have been ruled out, your veterinarian may diagnose idiopathic renal hematuria, ‘Idiopathic’ means that the cause is unknown. In cats, stress is believed to be a factor in a condition called feline idiopathic cystitis (bladder inflammation with unknown cause).

How do you tell if a dog has a UTI?

Dog UTI Symptoms – Like bladder infections in people, UTIs in dogs can be very painful. If your dog has a UTI, you might notice a number of signs, including:

  • Straining to urinate – Dogs with a UTI might strain to pee and be unable to go at all. They may also arch their backs, cry, or whine when they try to go to the bathroom because of the pain.
  • Blood in the urine – Blood or other discharge in the urine is a sure sign that something is up with your pup. Keep in mind that not all dogs with UTIs will have this symptom, but you should contact your veterinarian if you notice it.
  • Increased thirst – It can be hard to tell if your dog is drinking more water due to a UTI, especially in the summertime. But you should take note if you’re filling your dog’s water bowl more often than usual.
  • Frequent urination – If your dog can normally get through a good part of the day without having to pee but then suddenly needs to go out every hour or two, a UTI might be to blame.
  • Bathroom accidents – Dogs with a UTI can also have accidents around the house even though they are fully house-broken. This can happen because the dog is in pain or can’t control the flow of urine. UTIs can also cause a dog to leak pee even after they’ve gone to the bathroom.

Other signs that your dog has a UTI can include vomiting, strong-smelling urine, and a reduced appetite.